April 29, 2019

Biweekly Bulletin – April 29, 2019

FAA SAFETY SEMINAR – HOW TO USE DATALINK WEATHER IN THE COCKPIT

In-person seminar, Saturday, May 4, 11am at Sporty’s 

Join AirFacts editor and weather guru John Zimmerman for an in-person discussion of in-flight weather services and real-world weather flying strategies. From the basics of weather theory to real world tips, this webinar is packed with information you can use on your next flight. Includes a review of actual trips flown with different technology, and the lessons learned.

Learn about the options for portable weather receivers, a market that has grown significantly in recent years. From Sentry and Stratus to Garmin GDL and Dual, you’ll learn what these devices can do and how to use them in flight.

Registration is not required, but necessary to receive FAA WINGS credit.

FMI: SportysAcademy.com.

FLY THE NEW XSPEC 142 AVIATION TRAINING DEVICE

Complimentary for existing flight training customers during May

The XSPEC 142 is a versatile single and multiengine advanced aviation training device (AATD). The 142’s handling and performance characteristics are similar to that of a typical light single or twin-engine general aviation airplane and can be used for all phases of training.

The XSPEC 142 is an FAA-approved AATD that offers training for the Cessna 172, 172RG and Piper Aztec. The enhanced visuals system covers nearly 200 diagonal inches, making it among the biggest visuals systems ever approved for a general aviation flight simulator. Among the special features are a Garmin 530 navigator, Silver Crown radio stack and KFC 150 autopilot and flight director.

The XSPEC 142 training device may be used for private through commercial pilot training, recurrent training, interview preparation and a variety of scenario-based training.

To schedule, please contact your flight instructor or email us at Fly@SportysAcademy.com.

IF FACED WITH AN ENGINE FAILURE, REMEMBER YOUR ABCs

From Sporty’s Student Pilot News

by Eric Radtke

 

It was Fulghum who authored the New York Times bestseller, All I Really Need to know I Learned in Kindergarten. The simple and beloved creed has guided many in their personal and professional lives and offers a valuable lesson in efficiency and effectiveness. Its wisdom has been applied to everything from home life to business dealings and has its place on the flight deck as well.

When an emergency strikes, seconds matter. Indecision is the enemy and reduces your options and likelihood of a positive outcome. My advice is not to say one can’t alter plans in a dynamic situation such as an engine failure; however, the new choice should be obvious as evaluating any new plan will cost precious time.

While complete engine failures are not common, the stakes are high which is why pilots train extensively for such occurrences and why they get evaluated as part of a checkride. If faced with an engine failure, or training for your next engine failure with your instructor, act quick and decisively by remembering what you learned in kindergarten – your ABCs.

Read more at Sporty’s StudentPilotNews.com. 

NTSB ISSUES SAFETY ALERT FOR STABILIZED APPROACHES

Several accidents cited for failure to maintain a stabilized approach

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) recently released a safety alert regarding the importance of stabilized approaches. The notice emphasizes that “failing to establish and maintain a stabilized approach, or continuing an unstabilized approach, could lead to landing too fast and/or beyond the desired touchdown point increasing the likelihood of a runway overrun or loss of control event.

The Alert also provides pilots with helpful tips on how to maintain a stabilized approach including:

  • Follow SOPs and industry best practices for stabilized approach criteria, including a normal glidepath, specified airspeed and descent rate, landing configuration, power setting, landing checklists, and a heading that ensures only small changes are necessary to maintain runway alignment.
  • Practice go-arounds and missed approaches so that you are comfortable with the procedures when needed.
  • Use effective single-pilot resource management or crew resource management.
  • Do not allow perceived operational pressures (for example, from air traffic controllers, passengers, etc.), continuation bias, or last-minute runway changes to influence your decision to execute a go-around.
  • Never attempt to “save” an unstabilized approach.

Visit NTSB.gov for additional resources and to read the entire Safety Alert.

FAA MEDICALS AND BASIC MED AT SPORTY’S

Now offering Basic Med evaluations – schedule now for spring

FAA Aviation Medical Examiner, Dr. John Held, offers aviation medical exams and basic med evaluations at Sporty’s Clermont County Airport on select Saturdays. The cost of the exam is $100 payable by cash or check (no credit cards accepted).  An EKG (if required) is subject to an additional $35 fee.

DATE

TIME

Saturday, May 11

9am – 1pm

Saturday, June 1

9am – 1pm

Saturday, July 13

9am – 1pm

Saturday, August 3

9am – 1pm

Saturday, August 24

9am – 1pm

To schedule, please call Sporty’s at 513.735.9100 ext. 0.

For pilots pursuing Basic Med, the required online training is now available through two approved sources – AOPA and Mayo Clinic.

CERTIFICATES, RATINGS AND SOLOS

Congratulations on recent achievements at Sporty’s Academy

April 2 – Anthony Le, Commercial (left), with instructor Megan Gerding

April 2 – Erik Muldrow, Private pilot (right), with instructor Megan Gerding

April 9 – Dan Zamlich, ATP (right), with instructor Tom Baresel

April 10 – Cara Courts, Private pilot (right), with instructor Clayton Lulay

April 10 – Paul Moorman, Commercial pilot (right), with instructor Erik Trogdon

April 17 – Justin Roy, Commercial pilot (right), with instructor Erik Trogdon

April 25 – Matt Crossty, First solo (right), with instructor Kaitlin Willhite – watch the video

VIDEO TIP: INDUCED AND PARASITE DRAG

During your flight training, you’ll learn all about the 4 forces acting on the airplane in flight, including lift, thrust, weight and drag. This week’s tip takes a closer look at the aerodynamic forces that cause the rearward force of drag, including a breakdown of parasite vs. induced drag.

 

 

 

Safe Flying!

Phone: 513.735.9500

Website: www.SportysAcademy.com

Blog: www.StudentPilotNews.com

FB: www.facebook.com/SportysAcademy 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/SportysAcademy

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