August 19, 2019

Biweekly Bulletin – August 19, 2019

SIRIUS XM DATALINK WEATHER AVAILABLE IN SPORTY’S C182

Pilots now have access to pro level services

Pilots flying Skylane 6167L now have complimentary access to Sirius XM satellite weather. From block to block, you’ll have superior graphical weather at your fingertips to maximize your situational awareness and comfort.

Sirius XM Pro includes essential weather information for all pilots with radar, TAFs, METARs, weather observations and warnings; graphical winds and temperatures aloft; plus features such as echo tops and cloud tops. For those longer flights, pilots also can access extended forecasts; 6 levels of graphical turbulence and Icing NOWcast.

Sirius XM offers no altitude or line-of-site restrictions and is available coast to coast at no additional charge to Sporty’s customers flying equipped aircraft.

Schedule your next flight now at SportysAcademy.com.

ADS-B vs SIRIUS XM DATALINK WEATHER – WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE

from Sporty’s iPad Pilot News

 

Datalink weather, either from ADS-B or SiriusXM, is an essential tool for almost all pilots. Once you’ve flown a cross country with in-flight radar, up-to-date METARs, and visual AIRMETs, it’s awfully hard to go back to flying without it. It makes flying safer, easier, and more comfortable – a rare combination.

Garmin’s GDL 52 receives both ADS-B and SiriusXM.

If you’re considering a datalink weather receiver for your iPad (like a Sentry, Stratus, or GDL), one of the first decisions you’ll face is the source of your weather data: ADS-B or SiriusXM? Both are reliable systems that deliver the same key information, so neither one is a bad choice. But there are important differences to consider. Let’s review each option.

Read more at Sporty’s iPadPilotNews.com.

INTERNATIONAL FLIGHT PLAN BECOMES MANDATORY

pilots should begin using international form immediately 

The FAA will transition to mandatory use of the international flight plan format on August 27, 2019. The change is part of an effort to modernize and streamline flight planning and supports the FAA’s NextGen initiatives. Several improvements to the international form make it easier and more intuitive for pilots to use and will increase safety, including an increase in the size of the departure and destination fields to allow a greater variety of entry types, including Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA) flight plans.

When using flight plan filing services, all features available today will be part of the new format and provide an additional level of detail required for deployment of the FAA’s NextGen technologies and procedures.

Simplified guidance on how to complete an international flight plan is available at bit.ly/2JiUkQN.

SPORTY’S ECA ANNOUNCES 2019-20 RATES

effective September 1, 2019 

Sporty’s ECA strives to deliver quality service, safe, reliable aircraft and modern facilities to enhance your aviation experience. To continue supporting that goal, effective September 1, 2019, Sporty’s ECA will introduce a primary instruction rate of $43/hr and an advanced instruction (Instrument/Commercial) of $48/hr. Additionally, the following aircraft rates will apply:

Sporty’s 172 LITE – $122/hr

Cessna 172 – $142/hr

Cessna 172S – $151/hr

Cessna 182 – $199/hr

For the complete rate schedule, please visit SportysAcademy.com.

MAGIC CARPET RIDES

From Sporty’s Student Pilot News

By Charlie Masters 

On June 19, 2019 we departed Lake Hood’s (PALH) 2,200 foot gravel runway in Skyhawk 12138 rented from Arctic Flyers and Alaska became the 50th state in (or over) which I have flown an airplane.  During the 1-hour flight, we flew over the Susitna River Flats and were able to observe Grizzlies, Moose and a pod of Beluga whales – in their natural habitat – from an altitude of 600 feet.  Rather than undergo a formal checkout including studying the ins and outs of Anchorage’s FAA Part 93 area, we took CFI and knowledgeable tour guide Rick Ruess along on this memorable flight.

Flying in all the states was never a goal of mine, until last winter when my wife, Rose Ann, and I were planning our Alaskan trip to see my cousin who lives in Anchorage.  I realized this would be the 50th state I had visited and started perusing my log books to determine in which states I had flown.

Read more at Sporty’s StudentPilotNews.com.

FAA MEDICALS AND BASIC MED AT SPORTY’S

Now offering Basic Med evaluations – schedule now for remainder of 2019

FAA Aviation Medical Examiner, Dr. John Held, offers aviation medical exams and basic med evaluations at Sporty’s Clermont County Airport on select Saturdays. The cost of the exam is $100 payable by cash or check (no credit cards accepted).  An EKG (if required) is subject to an additional $35 fee.

DATE

TIME

Saturday, August 24

9am – 1pm

Saturday, September 14

9am – 1pm

Saturday, October 12

9am – 1pm

Saturday, November 2

9am – 1pm

Saturday, December 14

8am – noon

To schedule, please call Sporty’s at 513.735.9100 ext. 0. 

For pilots pursuing Basic Med, the required online training is available through two approved sources – AOPA and Mayo Clinic.

CERTIFICATES, RATINGS AND SOLOS

Congratulations on recent achievements at Sporty’s Academy

July 9 – Charlie Dietz (right), Commercial Pilot, with instructor John Dreyer

 

July 12 – Taylor Cozad (right), Private Pilot, with instructor John Dreyer 

July 24 – Bobby Meyer (right), Private Pilot, with instructor AJ Sweatland 

July 27 – Mike Durkee (right), Multiengine, with instructor Tom Baresel

 

July 27 – Nick Wiehoff (right), Instrument Flight Instructor, with instructor Dakota Baker

July 27 – Logan Sloan (right), Instrument Rating, with instructor Alex Bryant

August 2 – Justin Roy (left), Flight Instructor, with instructor Ken Kostolich

August 5 – Christian Bricca (right), Private Pilot, with instructor Dakota Baker 

 August 10 – Stanley Chin (right), First Solo, with instructor Matt Citak – watch the video

August 12 – Nael Asad (left), Instrument Rating, with instructor Ken Kostolich

 

August 14 – David Alvarez (right), Instrument Rating, with instructor Alex Bryant

 

VIDEO TIP: HOW TO CALCULATE TAKEOFF AND LANDING DISTANCES

Just about every airplane includes performance data in the Pilot’s Operating Handbook to calculate the runway length required for takeoff and landing under various conditions. The FARs require you to determine these distances as part of your preflight responsibilities, but fortunately the charts published for today’s modern airplanes make this task a breeze. This week’s tip takes a look at how perform this calculation using the common “chase-around” style charts.

 

 

 

Safe Flying!

Phone: 513.735.9500

Website: www.SportysAcademy.com

Blog: www.StudentPilotNews.com

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